New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Canterbury

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Issued at 30/07/2016 5:38pm. Valid till 1/08/2016 6pm

Arthur's Pass

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
New storm slabs have formed on Saturday with up to 50cm of new snow close to the divide. Skier triggered avalanches are likely on Sunday. Larger slabs should be expected on lee slopes (S-E) and in higher elevations. These slabs will be gaining strength on Sunday but on Monday and Tuesday they will get added to with more snow and wind.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Old weak layers have been dormant and unreactive for a while but the recent snowfall could awaken these sleeping dragons. The new load and particularly surface slab avalanches have the chance to trigger deeper slabs and step down into older, weaker snow. These weak layers are anywhere from 70-200cm down. Be cautious on all avalanche terrain in S-E aspects above 1800m. If this layer continues to be dormant it may have rounded (stabilized) enough to not be of concern.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
On Thursday and Friday we observed several soft slabs in steep terrain on lee slopes, both natural and skier triggered. No field obs on Saturday.
There was one avalanche in particular that stands out: a soft slab on the NE side of Rome Ridge on Mt Rolleston. This shows how the wind shifted from NW to SW and loaded a NE face.These slabs slid within the recent snow (well above the July 23 rain crust/mush).

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
There is a lot of new snow (up to 300cm worth) over the last week. Some of the snow has come in wet with light winds which means that even the windward faces are collecting more snow - finally! Lee slopes are heavily loaded. There is snow all the way down to 800m in some places.

Deeper in the snowpack on lee, shady slopes, there are still lingering weak layers. These problem (facet) layers have been quiet but they are still out there (from 80-200cm deep).

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Sunday is mainly clear. Monday and Tuesday bring in another few rounds of snow and wind. Wednesday and Thursday are mainly fine.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
One climber on Monday reported that he very DEARLY wished he had had his crampons with him for a 30deg section of exposed rain crust. Use caution travelling about the park as areas of exposed rain crust will be very slippery. Crampons and an Ice axe should be carried.

Forecast by Peter Biskind

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center