New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Canterbury

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Issued at 24/08/2016 8:32am. Valid till 25/08/2016 6pm

Arthur's Pass

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
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Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Stiff wind slabs have formed predominantly lee to the N-W above 1400m up to 50cm deep. Bed surfaces for these slabs are varied from firm melt/freeze crust to rained-on and softened old snow. These slabs will continue to gain strength on Wednesday until they get added to with the next round of precip. These slabs are stubborn and unlikely to release but stay cautious and avoid newly loaded slopes and/or watch for convex roll overs.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
The moisture coming in Wednesday night and Thursday is looking warm. Freezing levels will rise throughout the storm all the way up to 2000m. Rain on snow rapidly weakens snow bonds. Small wet loose avalanches are likely on steep slopes anywhere rain hits snow.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
On Monday we saw NUMEROUS fast, natural dry loose avalanches on Southerly aspects (big and little Phipps) and widespread roller balling. Also a few soft slabs were triggered using explosives on Southerly slopes up to 45cm deep. When Tuesday cleared we could see a natural storm slab avalanche on Mt Philistine that released probably on Sunday night (55m wide maybe 60cm deep).

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Tuesday returned spring conditions (temps up to 6C at 1400m) which means melt freeze crust on any solar aspects. Sunday and Monday brought 50mm of moisture with freezing levels ranging from 1200-1700m. The rain/snow mix is adhering well to the old layers. This most recent storm arrived wet (warm) enough to bond well to pretty much everything. The biggest avalanches in the next 48 hrs should come from terrain that is steep and has high wind exposure.

Below the recent snow is the typical history of snow, rain, snow, rain, sun, warm, warm.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Wednesday through the rest of the week is mixed: storm, somewhat calm, storm. Freezing levels on Thursday could be as high as 2000m with up to 20mm of rain.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
There are lots of firm and slippery slopes in the park at the moment. Ice and crampons recommended.

Forecast by Peter Biskind

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center