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Issued at 2/07/2015 7:13pm. Valid till 3/07/2015 6pm

Arthur's Pass

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Current snow is being blown onto lee slopes and certain pockets. Look for pillows and convex rolls to be 'easy' start zones and note where the snow is NOT piling up to help see where it is despositing. Use caution in steep terrain, watch for terrain traps, and if you must cross a start zone do so with caution and be mindful of the snow above you.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Heavy current and recent winds have distributed last week's snow to lee aspects. Feel around in the snow for surface slabs on lee slopes (quick hand pits work well), note that they may be lower down the avalanche path. These slabs may be stubborn and unreactive but practicing safe travel techniques and eyes-on partnership will help reduce risk. Remember that wind slabs can be very stubborn and can release on the 2nd+ skier also.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
We have not seen any slab avalanches since the last storm but Thursday we saw new snow running in small isolated pockets of dry loose snow, triggered by skiers. The storm we are in right now will change conditions substantially with both the new snow and winds.
Please report any observations you have via the link on the home page.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
We are just getting out onto the slopes here at Temple Basin but what we are seeing is that last weeks snow is bonding well to the older snow (due mainly to the warm conditions/rain). Below last weeks snow are various crusts and wind distributed (stripped) layers. There is a lot of variability depending on aspect and elevation. The particularly high winds we just had have moved snow onto lee West slopes where start zones could be lower than expected.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Preciption and moderate to high winds all day Thursday are expected to continue on Friday.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Peter Biskind

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website