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Issued at 1/09/2015 4:41pm. Valid till 3/09/2015 6pm

Ohau

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Storm snow avalanching is likely on many aspects, but especially where the snow is falling on the widespread crust, below about 1900m.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
4
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
The windslab danger will be on the rise, especially once the NW change kicks in, reversing the recent loading pattern. There will be copious amounts of new snow to be moved about by the strong NW winds, and touchy windslab conditions are likely. The windslab concern will become the primary hazard once the NW wind starts to blow.

Tertiary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Low density snow, little wind,(for now) means that loose dry avalanching is likely. As mentioned above, the crust will aid the acceleration of any avalanching.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Nothing new reported, but this is likely to change over the next 24 hours.






Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
10-20cms of low density snow is likely to have fallen about the region to low elevation as of Tuesday afternoon with moderate winds out of the E/SE at ridge line. Below about 1800m the new snow is falling on a firm crust that may initially hamper bonding and provide a good bed surface for any avalanching to pick up speed.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Continuing snow fall over Tuesday night to low levels with a strong to gale NW change as the low tracks south. Snowfall should ease later Wednesday as a brief ridge pushes on to the South Island. Storm snow totals are likely to be in the 30-50cm range.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Forecast NW gales are likely to expose firm crusts. Keep your eye out for that patch of glaze.

Forecast by Ben Taylor

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
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Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website