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Issued at 4/08/2015 6:29pm. Valid till 5/08/2015 6pm

Ohau

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Human triggered Windslab avalanching on slopes lee to the NW or local wind effect is possible, especially on steep slopes just below ridgeline. Upwind areas that show clear signs of wind scouring are a good indication of deep loading on the lee side. Take time to check the bond between the upper layers of the snowpack before committing to avalanche terrain and make sure your beacon is switched on and that your partner knows how to swing a shovel and search.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Shallow storm slab avalanching is possible in some steep sheltered start zones. Most human triggered slabs occur on the first fine day out after a storm so take care on wednesday.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
no reports of natural avalanching at the ski area today.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Around 30cms of new snow lies over a pretty well settled rain wet old snowpack. The area has experienced moderate wind loading from the NW. Windslab accumulation on lee slopes could be up to a meter deep in places. While observations at the ski area indicate that the new snow is bonding moderately well to the old surface, things could be different out in the unmodified back country snowpack.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Rain to above 2000m on the 3rd has been followed by a fine break then fresh snow fall and a lowering freezing level. Strong Nor west winds have swung to the west and eased off.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Refrozen wet snow at low elevations could provide a good sliding surface.

Forecast by Trevor Streat

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website