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Issued at 23/10/2014 7:54am. Valid till 24/10/2014 6pm

Wanaka

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Only a small amount of snow is likely accumulate from the forecast SW storm on Thursday afternoon/evening. We expect small pockets of dense wind slab may build lee to the SW half in the higher elevations. These will likely be sensitive to triggering by light loads through Friday but should cure and begin to be more stubborn to triggers by Saturday. Give these areas time to settle for now, and choose low angled terrain until these problem aspects have had time to heal.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
9am - 5pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
There is a moderate danger of wet slide activity. This will be mainly confined to very steep areas that will get some sun. Be wary of passing under these hot spots, especially if combined with gully features that may help channel debris and travel longer than you think. As the snow warms and softens (weakens) stick to high ground like ridges and spurs or select lower angled terrain.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
A cycle of wet slab and wet loose avalanches occurred during the violent and warm NW storm last Thurs/Fri/Sat. These avalanches were surprisingly small for the amount of rain we endured and were confined to very steep terrain only.

View some pics here http://tinyurl.com/nd5pdqh

Our observation network is limited at this time of year. Please let us know if you have been out and seen any activity.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Snow showers are forecast to deliver up to 15cm above 2000m late Thursday. Should this eventuate it will be mostly confined to western areas and will likely be sensitive to triggering for the first 36hrs. Above 1300m a dusting of new snow during Monday has coated an other wise refrozen spring snowpack.The rain soaked snowpack has had a chance to drain from last week's drenching, and cooler temps since Sunday night will have helped to lock up the old snow at least on the surface.

Gather you own field observations from low angled or short slopes that have little/no consequence before committing to larger slopes.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
A cold front will arrive later today (Thursday) bringing snow showers to low levels but only above approximately 2000m will there be any significant accumulations. Winds will be above 70km/h at ridge tops starting off from the NW then coming round to be from the SW as the front arrives. Freezing levels will lower to help refreeze the old snow, but the sun will quickly weaken areas facing the northerly half of the compass on Friday.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Cooler temperatures have likely refrozen surface snow layers and created a hard slick surface. Be wary of the terrain below you and where a sliding fall might take you. Use appropriate safety equipment like ice axe and crampons if necessary.

Forecast by Gordon Smith

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
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