New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Southern Lakes

Be kept in the loop:
Email Sign up
YouTube
Join
MetService Getting the goods on the weather forecast is never easy. Get your mountain weather forecast right now!
Link ArrowMet Service
Issued at 20/07/2017 7:44am. Valid till 21/07/2017 6pm

Queenstown

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
A lot of wind transport at ridge-line yesterday and more today from a different direction. Consolidation of the snowpack continued with more warm temps. We know there are weak facets in random areas, be cautious as they may be reactive to overloading. We have had several warm days with many buried weak layers now coming under tension, this is probably now only above 1800 m. Added to this is today's redistribution of any loose snow. We are scheduled to receive another significant fall of new snow over the next 48 hrs. The avalanche danger will be increasing.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Weak layers are down 50 cms in the snowpack, deeper given a lot of wind transport. Triggering an avalanche on these buried weak layers is still a possibility mainly above 1800 m. Tension and extra weight is being added to the snowpack with lots of wind transport and more snow arriving tomorrow. Avoid overloading large open slopes above 1800m. There may be a natural cycle of avalanches in the coming days as these layers are tested.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
No new activity was recorded yesterday, however there was significant wind transport at ridge-crest. More evidence was seen of the natural avalanches from earlier in the week. No evidence of the PWL failing just yet. Keep a conservative approach in your mindset, avoiding areas of stiff windslab on shady aspects. Keep to good techniques like one at a time and safe point to safe point.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
A mixed bag in the backcountry, we've had a few good days of consolidation with very warm temps yesterday. Don't drop your guard, deeper weak layers are alive and well. Stay well clear of any steep terrain, especially where hard windslab deposits have formed, given the various changes in wind direction this could be most aspects. Tension and weight are being added to surviving weak layers, with plenty of variability in the snowpack. The backcountry is still a real mixed bag, there will be snow available for transport today with gale force N winds this morning. Expect more windslab development.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
The worst of the weather will be on us tomorrow, not too bad around here today with brief morning rain and snow to 1600 m. Winds from N, gale force this mid morning, turning E and easing. Freezing level rising to around 2300 m, that's warm folks !


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Chris Cochrane

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center