New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Fiordland

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Issued at 23/08/2016 9:21am. Valid till 26/08/2016 6pm

Fiordland

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
10am - 3pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Snow which fell in Sundays storm (over half a meter) was moved around by gale strength winds from the north and northwest. Areas of wind slab are likely on south and east facing slopes, down to elevations of 1700m, perhaps lower. The bond between the wind slab and old surface may be weak.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
As a few small fronts move through Fiordland in the next few days, slopes below 1500m may receive rain. Rain on the snow weakens the surface snow, making small loose avalanches and wet slab avalanches possible. While likely to be small, and often around rock bands, they can run along way. funnelling in to gullies and terrain traps.Take note of what is above you move about on lower slopes.

Tertiary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Rain through the snow, sun and the lack of overnight freezes has weakened the snowpack at lower elevations (below 1500m), more so on sunny aspects. Wet slabs are possible when any additional weight (rain or a person) is added to a suspect slope. These may run to ground, with the tussocks being a perfect sliding surface.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
No recent observations. Observations from Friday (20/8/16) - Jackson Peaks. Wet loose avalanches observed between 1100-1600m on sunny (northern) aspects. They are small (size 1-2) but have run a long way. Glide cracks have led to thin wet slabs avalanches between 1100- 1400m, about 30 - 40cm deep and ran to ground (on the tussocks).

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Over 50cm of snow fell on higher slopes in Northern Fiordland ( 20-21 August) with less at lower elevations and to the south and east. Above 1700m the snow pack is generally well consolidated., (with recent deposited wind slab over laying). Below 1500m the snowpack has been rain soaked and the effects of the sun are evident. A melt Freeze crust sits on all aspects will be sitting under any new snow. Snow depths at lower levels are starting to thin out with about 30cm snow depth at 1000m, and in general warm temperatures in the last week have caused a big melt down.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Occasional rain with snow showers down to 1400m at times.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Brenda George

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center