New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Canterbury

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Issued at 24/07/2016 6:33pm. Valid till 25/07/2016 6pm

Craigieburn Range

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
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Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
There is a CONSIDERABLE danger from wind slab avalanches. Wind slabs from 50-100cm thick may be found under ridges and around rocks and cliffs where snow can build up. Wind slabs may have been formed in the lower areas of start zones and paths due to GALE winds. Avoid steep (>35 deg) terrain where new wind slabs have formed and stay well away from any cornices.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
There is a MODERATE danger from wet slab avalanches. Wet slab avalanches could occur at some upper and middle elevation locations. Wet slab avalanches are difficult to predict and nearly impossible to time but if we were to see one it is most likely in the next 24-36 hours. Stay out of the run-out zones of steep (>35 deg) avalanche paths holding significant (>0.5m) snowpack.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
On Saturday the Mt Cheeseman Ski Patrol spotted a size 2 loose wet avalanche on the S face of Mt Wall. This avalanche traveled over 300m entraining all of the snow in its path.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Observations are limited at this time but it is expected that the warm wet weather in the last day and a half has greatly affected our snowpack. Over 20mm of rain has fallen at lower elevations in the southern half of the Craigieburn Range. With freezing levels well over 2000m all elevations were feeling the heat. Thankfully the rain started to turn to snow on Sunday with over 20cm of new snow recorded at middle elevations. Freezing levels have dropped below 1000m Sunday evening.

For Monday I would expect a mixed bag of conditions. Our older snowpack is likely still saturated and moist while new stiff wind slabs will likely be found at upper and middle elevations. The skiing and riding has definitely improved on S and E aspects but N and W aspects have again been stripped by nuclear winds.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Unruly weather conditions will begin to wind down in the Craigieburn Range on Monday. Expect STRONG TO GALE SW and S winds at middle and upper elevations but these will likely lessen as the day goes on. Snow may continue to fall intermittently and temperatures should stay cool. A FAFL of 1000-1500m is forecast for the day.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Brad Carpenter

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center