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Issued at 31/07/2015 5:52am. Valid till 1/08/2015 6pm

Craigieburn Range

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
1
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
There is a LOW danger from wind slab avalanches. New wind slabs formed on all aspects on Wednesday and Thursday. Watch the upper areas of slopes just below ridgelines and around rock outcroppings where new wind slabs have formed. Recently near Queenstown a very small (< size 1) wind slab avalanche swept a skier over a 20m cliff and seriously injured him. The avalanche occurred just outside of the ski area boundary. This is a good reminder that even a small avalanche can have serious consequences.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Ski patrol in the northern and southern end of the Craigieburn Range tested multiple locations with explosives on Thursday. One small size 1 wind slab avalanche was triggered on an E facing slope just below a ridgeline in the southern end of the range.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
The snowpack is generally stable at this time. There are still isolated pockets of hard wind slab and cornice in upper elevation terrain. Beneath the new snow is an ice crust that is widespread in the Craigieburn Range and varies in thickness from 3-10cm or more. A great deal of variability may be found beneath the new icy crust. On Thursday professional observers in the northern end of the Craigieburn Range had disconcertingly easy failures on a layer of buried facets in their snowpack tests. Ski patrol around the Craigieburn Range are also seeing a weak and faceted snowpack beneath the ice crust in many locations. The danger from this kind of weak snowpack is not immediate until we get a large new load of snow or rain or if the snowpack were impacted by a large trigger such as a cornice failure. If that happens we could see stability decrease rapidly. The snowpack varies greatly from slope to slope and elevation to elevation right now. It's a good idea to get out your shovel and dig down into the snow to see for yourself what is going on.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Mainly clear and fine conditions this morning with increasing high cloud into the afternoon. The NW wind will increase by the end of the day to moderate and strong velocities. Light rain and snow showers may be possible closer to the divide. The freezing level will rise to above 2500m by the evening.

For more information you can click the MetService link below:


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Recent rain and cold overnight temperatures have refrozen the surface and made for dangerous traveling conditions in some spots. Carrying an ice axe and crampons is advised.

Forecast by Brad Carpenter

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website