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Issued at 1/08/2014 4:40pm. Valid till 2/08/2014 6pm

Nelson Lakes

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Wind slab may develop above 1800m on south and eastern aspects with snow and stong northwest winds forecasted. This is likely to effect the south western parts of the National Park where there is more existing snow on the ground. Given the suspect nature of the existing snow on the ground caution will be required on south and eastern aspects above 1800. A risng freezing level will exaserbate this problem.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
1
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Isolated slopes below 1800m may have sufficient snow to produce avalanches especially in the SW parts of the National Park. There is a possibility of wet snow avalanches on all aspect below 1800m as the snow become saturated. It is expected that any avalanche activity would be small.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
No observations of avalanche activity.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Currently intermittent snow cover exists in the National Park below 2000m in the north and eastern parts of the national park. Specifically the northern end of the Travers and St Arnaud Range. Isolated slopes at upper elevations to threshold or a point that they have enough snow to produce an avalanche.
The south and western parts of the National park have more significant snow cover. Areas south and west of Travers Saddle such as Mt Mahanga, Waiau Pass and the head of the Durville river have more snow cover on all aspects. The forecasting team has little information at this point from the snowpack in this part of the park. Little evidence of avalanche activity exist from the air but due to the shallow nature of the snow pack and the previous clear and cold conditions this snow is likely to have become progressively weak. Snow from the north west quarter above 1800m will see the formation of wind slabs on SE aspects.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
A disturbed northwesterly flow will dominate the weather for the rest of this week.
More showers. Snow level lowering to 1300 metres tomorrow night. Northwest severe gale, easing in the evening.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Adrian Briggs

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
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