New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Mackenzie

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Issued at 20/07/2017 2:08pm. Valid till 22/07/2017 6pm

Aoraki/Mt Cook

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
A considerable danger from storm slab avalanching is forecast to exist on all aspects by Noon on Friday. On Northerly aspects, wind loading will add significantly to the potential depth and likelihood of avalanching. On the SE faces above 1900, we have weak layers up to 80cms deep in the pack which could kick off under additional load of storm snow to produce large slides. Below 1900m a rain crust could also provide a good sliding surface for slabs and sluffs in the new snow. Danger levels could rise to high if snowfall intensity and wind-loading effects are sufficiently high. The next two days are not a good time to be on or beneath avalanche terrain.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Two days of NW wind-loading has built slab on many S and E facing slopes especially up near the divide. Triggering right now is more likely on slopes just below ridgeline but pockets of slab could exist downwind of terrain features in many places. Avoid steep terrain Facing SW through to E, especially those places where an avalanche could funnel down into terrain traps like gullies cliffs or rocks.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
A snowboarder triggered a slab, size 2 on a SE aspect at 2100m in the Gammack range last Friday.
Size 1 loose snow avalanches ran on solar aspects in fine weather on Saturday.
Rain triggered loose wet slides up to size 2 ran on Sunday as well as a few slab avalanches at size 2 on various aspects at upper elevations.
On Tuesday a shallow size 1.5 slab released in sun warmed snow on a N aspect in the Tasman Gl at about 2100m.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
The regions snowpack is becoming increasingly variable following the latest series of alternating cold and warm storms. Key features at the moment are; A rain crust below 1900m, this was covered with a thin layer of dry snow Tuesday, but most of that is likely to have blown away by now. Moderate shears observed in the upper 20 cms of the pack Tuesday have also probably settled out thanks to wind and warmth. Deeper in the snowpack, at 50 to 80cms down, a weak faceted old surface layer buried on July 11th remained reactive to snow tests on SE aspects at high elevations on Tues. This layer is gaining strength and it will be interesting to see if extra loading from the coming storm tips the scales to trigger avalanches on it. Windslab development continues on S and E aspects and other sheltered spots. Snow cover, in general, is still comparatively thin but does extend well down to low elevations.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Freezing levels peaked at 2500m on Tuesday afternoon before the onset of strong NW winds that continue to blow today. Right now ( mid-day Thurs) it's 0 deg at 2000m. with thin overcast cloud cover and gale NW blowing at ridgeline. Winds will veer to the SE Friday bringing colder temperatures and heavy snowfall.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Trevor Streat

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
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Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center