New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Mackenzie

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Issued at 25/08/2016 6:43pm. Valid till 26/08/2016 6pm

Aoraki/Mt Cook

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
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Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
There is a moderate windslab danger above 2000m on S facing terrain as a result of northerly wind loading on Thursday.Take care to assess the local snowpack for signs of weakness before taking on steep lines. The danger is greatest on slopes just below ridgeline.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
A persistent weakness laid down early in the winter still exists in a few spots. Triggering an avalanche on this layer is unlikely but the consequences would be high. So far the few natural avalanches that could be attributed to this layer have been on very steep terrain along a line dividing glaciated terrain east of the divide from non-glaciated slopes further east.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Lots of small loose wet slides and rollers observed in the new snow as a result of rising temperatures late morning. No slab activity seen.


Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
30cm of new snow fell at Tasman Saddle on Sunday with 10cm reaching the Liebig range .This snow was redistributed by strong NW winds which lead to a short lived wind and storm slab avalanche cycle before things settled down. Another 20 to 40 cms fell on the Tasman Neve Wednesday night with 15 cms reaching eastern areas. Snow tests today did not reveal any notable weaknesses in these upper layers of the snowpack. Moderate N or NW winds were shifting snow at ridgeline however and some wind slab development on south faces is likely to have occurred.

A stubborn deep slab instability still exists in places on SE aspects above 2000m, as evidenced by a deep slab triggered by cornice fall late last week in the Hoophorn valley. A few other deep slabs have been observed in similar locations this month. All have run on very steep unsupported terrain out east of the divide in glaciated terrain.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
A cloudy start gave way to mostly fine weather by late afternoon thursday. Easterly cloud and snow fall forecast for tomorrow.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Spring snow, watch out for hard frozen surface conditions especially in the morning before things warm up.

Forecast by Trevor Streat

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center