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Issued at 29/08/2015 11:45am. Valid till 30/08/2015 6pm

Aoraki/Mt Cook

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Watch out for storm or wind slab avalanching above about 2000m near the main divide. Slides up to size 2.5 are possible on South aspects and there is a chance of some paths running to low elevations if they entrain the wet snow found below 1800m.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
3
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Loose wet snow slides are likely below 1800m in rain soaked snow. Any steep slopes are suspect but especially avoid places where the debris could be funneled into gullies or terrain traps. Wet snow is very heavy so even a small slide can apply quite a bit of force to you - or your avalanche poodle.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Low cloud is hampering obs this morning. No fresh activity seen yesterday.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Up to 20cms of new snow could have fallen above 2300m on the divide overnight along with some Northerly windloading. The amount of new snow tapers off with altitude below 2300 and distance east of the divide with rain below 1800m. The current storm came in warm so a reasonable bond between new and old snow is expected to develop over the next 24 hrs. At higher elevations about the divide weaknesses within the storm snow or windslab are likely to exist.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
The freezing level has dropped from 2300m overnight to 1800m this morning and there's light to moderate precipitation. Winds are light in the valleys' but there are moderate N or NE winds across exposed tops.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Forecast by Trevor Streat

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website