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Issued at 25/10/2014 3:36pm. Valid till 27/10/2014 6pm

Aoraki/Mt Cook

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
As the next storm passes through the park there will be an increasing danger of windslab and storm snow slab both within the new snow deposited in this event and potentially "stepping down" to the layer where the last storm snow lay on the old snow surface. Don't put away your shovel and probe just yet. You still want to have a good poke around before committing yourself to a route.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
2
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
10am - 5pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
During the middle of the day we can expect the surface snow to sluff out of steep terrain, particularly out of steep terrain. Pick your timing when travelling through solar affected slopes and don't stop for lunch in the potential runout zone from these slide paths. Spring is the time of year that this type of avalanche is known to run for long distances, sometimes right down to the valley floors. Places like the northern slopes above the Western approaches to the Copland pass have often produced spectacular spring slides.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
several small to mid sized loose snow events in the Ben Ohau range observed Tuesday morning and a couple of slab releases on steep South to SE aspects including one size 2-3 slab on an eastern aspect off Mt Annette which ran early Wednesday. Nothing observed since then.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Previous snow pack was well settled and stable.
The bond with the snow from earlier in the week may still need investigation, evidenced by recent slabs observed near the Annette plateau and in Gorilla stream and there may be 20-30cm new loading overnight on Saturday.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Rain developing later on Saturday near to the Divide. Should ease to showers later, with a few lingering through until Monday. Fresh to strong NW winds, slowly swing around to the SE by the end of the long weekend.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
With the spring conditions bringing firm snow down low in the mornings, it's time to consider adding a pair of crampons and an axe to the travelling kit.
Sliding on firm snow is only fun until it comes time to stop. Rocks and nasty runouts hurt.

Forecast by Dave McKinley

Mountain Safety Council
Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche CenterNational Incedent Database website