New Zealand Mountan Safety Council

Mackenzie

Be kept in the loop:
Email Sign up
YouTube
Join
MetService Getting the goods on the weather forecast is never easy. Get your mountain weather forecast right now!
Link ArrowMet Service
Issued at 6/12/2016 8:21am. Valid till 7/12/2016 6pm

Aoraki/Mt Cook

Mountain
Current avalanche advisory
High Alpine

Above 2000 meters

Alpine

1000 to 2000 meters

Sub Alpine

Below 1000 meters

Avalanche Danger Scale
Avalanche Danger Scale
Report TutorialPrint Reporthear report

Primary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
1
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
All day
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
In places, there remains pockets of up to 20-30cm of cold snow from last weeks storm system and the NW winds of that. This is often lying over a very firm icy surface which, given extra loading or weight (through rain for example) could produce slab avalanches.

Secondary Avalanche Danger

Dangerous Aspects
high
Danger Rose
1
Highest Danger Rating
Likelihood
indicator
gauge
Certain
Likely
Unlikely
Size
indicator
gauge
Largest
Small
Trend
indicator
gauge
Increasing
No change
Decreasing
Time of day
clock
Time of day
10am - 5pm
Alpine level
High Alpine: Above 2000m
Alpine: 1000 to 2000m
Low Alpine: Below 1000m
Description:
Later in the day on Tuesday, or by Wednesday morning as the rain sets in there will be a gradual increase in the possibility of loose wet avalanching out of steep terrain.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Avalanche Activity
Not a lot of activity seen over the last few days. Likely to see more come Wednesday.

Current Snowpack Conditions

Current Snowpack Conditions
Multiple layers exist in the upper pack thanks to recent cold snowy outbreaks interspersed with warm spells and overnight freezes. Surface layers are a mix of 20-3cm of cold snow on a hard icy base or that capped by a Rime/Ice crust.
Windslab deposits have been observed on some South and east aspects as a result of the strong NW to SW gales that have affected the region a week ago.
The bond between the older firm layer and these deposits seems reasonable, but some tests have managed to produce shears.

Mountain Weather

Mountain Weather
Strong Nor' Westerlies are preceding an active frontal system that will cross the Park later on Tuesday/Wednesday bringing heavy precipitation falling as snow at the very highest reaches of the Divide.


MetService
For more information go to: http://www.metservice.com/mountain/index

Sliding Danger

Slide For Life
Clear skies at night often lead to hard frozen surface snow the next morning. Take care to either be equipped with axe and crampons or have the ability to wait until things soften before crossing steep slopes if you are overnighting at Mueller hut or some other snowy location.

Forecast by Dave McKinley

Avalanche Forecast Regions:
Mountain Safety Council managed websites
Mountainf Safety Council websiteAdventure Smart websiteNew Zealand Avalanche Center